+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Rust!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Woking, UK
    Posts
    52

    Default Rust!

    As I had the plastic trays off and the rear arch liners out today, I noticed a few rusty bits. Bugger! What’s the best thing to do?

    The front jacking points have a round hole which looks like they should have a rubber bungs in. Mine are open and there’s some surface rust around the holes. More so on the offside which looks like it has been grounded which has encouraged the rust. I was going to give that a damn good wire brushing, some rust remover and a coat of paint topped off with some waxoyl. Is that the best thing, and should there be bungs in those holes or do they stay open to let water drain out?

    Where the rear arch liner mounting screws are, there are rust patches which will quickly become holes if I have a go at them. What’s the best thing to do here? I could make some mild steel patches and I used to be able to weld, so I could give that a go, but then the arches don’t look like they are structural so could I simply cut out the grot and pop rivet some patches over and then simply use self tappers or similar to keep the arch liners in place?

    Interested to hear what others have done.

    Regards, Gordon.




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Aberdeenshire
    Posts
    1,961

    Default Re: Rust!

    The holes at front are vents I think. My Cabrio has them too. These are forward of the front under doorsill jacking points.

    Use two pack epoxy paint available from Rustbuster. Cover in Tetrosyl bitumen bodyschutz or similar. Comes in spray bottles and 1 litre cans requiring special spray gun and compressed air.

    Cut a piece of black plastic damp proof course membrane and fit snuggly over each stud for the wheel arch liners. Clean and paint first. If rusted and holed just glue in a repair panel with stainless steel roofing screw as stud. I use black polyurethane sealant to glue non structural members. Cost about £4 per 300 ml cartridge from Toolstation.

    Suggest you also remove plastic sill protectors. Mine was holed several places there both sides. Nearly made me cry.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Aberdeenshire
    Posts
    1,961

    Default Re: Rust!

    Here is link to the paint I used when restoring my rusty 450:
    http://www.rust.co.uk/rustbuster-cha...e-pack/p513004

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Woking, UK
    Posts
    52

    Default Rust!

    Quote Originally Posted by tolsen123 View Post
    The holes at front are vents I think. My Cabrio has them too. These are forward of the front under doorsill jacking points.

    Use two pack epoxy paint available from Rustbuster. Cover in Tetrosyl bitumen bodyschutz or similar. Comes in spray bottles and 1 litre cans requiring special spray gun and compressed air.

    Cut a piece of black plastic damp proof course membrane and fit snuggly over each stud for the wheel arch liners. Clean and paint first. If rusted and holed just glue in a repair panel with stainless steel roofing screw as stud. I use black polyurethane sealant to glue non structural members. Cost about £4 per 300 ml cartridge from Toolstation.

    Suggest you also remove plastic sill protectors. Mine was holed several places there both sides. Nearly made me cry.
    Thanks again Tolsen. Did you make your repair patches from mild steel plate? And did you use the DPC sandwiched between the arch and the plastic arch liner as extra protection, or am I misunderstanding you? I will definitely take the sill protectors off. Am still in denial at the moment! 🙄


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Aberdeenshire
    Posts
    1,961

    Default Re: Rust!

    On my rusty Cabrio I welded in sheet metal with stainless steel studs fitted. Damp proof course is fitted snuggly over stud and the intention is to limit water getting in between plastic wheel arch and steel. Plastic wheel arch has slotted holes so of course water will get in behind it.

    On 450 Smarts I have repaired for other owners I have simply glued on stainless steel repair patches with stainless steel studs using PU40. Source stainless steel sheet metal from scrapped washing machines etc.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Woking, UK
    Posts
    52

    Default Rust!

    Quote Originally Posted by tolsen123 View Post
    On my rusty Cabrio I welded in sheet metal with stainless steel studs fitted. Damp proof course is fitted snuggly over stud and the intention is to limit water getting in between plastic wheel arch and steel. Plastic wheel arch has slotted holes so of course water will get in behind it.

    On 450 Smarts I have repaired for other owners I have simply glued on stainless steel repair patches with stainless steel studs using PU40. Source stainless steel sheet metal from scrapped washing machines etc.
    Okay got it. Thanks again.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    Edinburgh
    Posts
    9

    Default Re: Rust!

    Just to reinforce what's been said...



    I recently faced these issues and would suggest that if you've 'caught' the surface rust you're heading the right direction with what you're doing... From what I've seen of the structure the outside 'skin' (around the sills at least) is essentially non-structural. DO definitely do as suggested and get the sill plastics off for inspection/cleanup/repair. I welded my sills simply because that was the easiest way for me to go - under the arch liners wasn't seriously holed, though I did manage to twist off the studs that the plastic nuts go onto... I cleaned the area up, cut away the rust, primed and undersealed then made up cover plates from aluminium. - you 'could' fibreglass over this; but in the past I've found that 'flashing tape' - bitumen backed aluminium foil, is a good protectant over properly closed repairs... I use a little heat to bond it, and have done this on a number of vehicles over these past 30 or so years to good effect.



    You've probably caught this in time - repairs are just a little messy; but that's part of the hobby. - Best of luck with it all.
    Last edited by Matt Quinn; 7th August 2018 at 21:43.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

     

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts